What happens if a woman takes viagra or cialis?

We know that in men, Viagra dilates blood vessels and increases blood flow to the penis. Women who take it may also have increased blood flow to the genitals. This can help increase sensitivity, arousal, and orgasmic function. There is anecdotal evidence that Viagra can increase sexual pleasure in women.

We know that Viagra works in men by increasing blood flow to the penis. In women, it is believed that Viagra might increase blood flow to the female genital area, increasing lubrication and aiding orgasm. This theory has led to research on women taking Viagra. Many of these studies have focused on the treatment of FSD.

However, medical trials to date have not produced significant evidence that Viagra works for women. Side effects of Viagra treatment were considered mild to moderate and included headaches, hot flashes, runny nose, and nausea. So far, there doesn't seem to be much research on the effects that Viagra would have on a woman. When the Viagra patent expired approximately 15 years later, several pharmaceutical companies began manufacturing a generic version of Viagra with sildenafil.

Viagra (sildenafil), the infamous “blue pill”, is an FDA-approved drug for people with erectile dysfunction that helps improve blood flow to the penis. A woman with normal hormone levels who has a good relationship and who used to enjoy sex but no longer does it could be a good candidate. As there has never been a medical trial large enough to investigate the effect of Viagra on women, authorities cannot say that Viagra is safe for women or comment on whether Viagra is actually effective in women. Sildenafil (Viagra) is a medication prescribed for the treatment of impotence (erectile dysfunction, ED) caused by medical or psychological conditions.

Women with arousal problems who took Viagra in a study funded by the drug manufacturer achieved sexual satisfaction more often than those who took placebo pills. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) did not approve the use of female Viagra, although studies are still underway to use the drug in women for conditions ranging from dysmenorrhea to decreased libido. In a clinical trial that studied Viagra in women for arousal disorder, mild to moderate side effects were reported that overlap with those seen when taking sildenafil for erectile dysfunction. For women, the brain is a much more important sexual organ and most of a woman's sexual response will begin in her brain.

Although the FDA has not approved Viagra for general use in women, several scientific studies have explored the effect that its active ingredient, sildenafil, has on women. A study earlier this year found that Viagra can significantly reduce the risk of another heart attack and increase life expectancy in men already diagnosed with cardiovascular disease. Many factors can cause low sexual desire in women The potential effects of Viagra may not address all of them. While increased blood flow to the genitals may help treat some of the symptoms related to female sexual dysfunction, there are no definite results to suggest that Viagra would work.