What does viagra do to a woman if she takes it?

We know that in men, Viagra dilates blood vessels and increases blood flow to the penis. Women who take it may also have increased blood flow to the genitals. This can help increase sensitivity, arousal, and orgasmic function. There is anecdotal evidence that Viagra can increase sexual pleasure in women.

We know that Viagra works in men by increasing blood flow to the penis. In women, it is believed that Viagra might increase blood flow to the female genital area, increasing lubrication and aiding orgasm. This theory has led to research on women taking Viagra. Many of these studies have focused on the treatment of FSD.

However, medical trials to date have not produced significant evidence that Viagra works for women. Unlike erectile dysfunction, which is largely measured by the strength and duration of an erection, female sexual dysfunction can have a much wider variety of symptoms that are different for every woman. Viagra is a phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE) inhibitor that helps relax smooth muscles. The question was first raised in the New York Times, in an article titled “Curious women are seeing if Viagra works wonders for them,” a few months after Viagra became available.

Although the FDA has not approved Viagra for general use in women, several scientific studies have explored the effect that its active ingredient, sildenafil, has on women. In addition to these possible side effects, Viagra may have a negative interaction with other medications, especially those used to treat high blood pressure. In the UK, a form of Viagra is available without a prescription for men over the age of 18, but the pharmacist must ask some private questions before delivering the medication. The most common dose of Viagra (sildenafil) to begin with is 50 mg, although it comes in three options, 25, 50 and 100 mg.

Viagra seemed to work best in women with sexual arousal problems who previously had satisfying sex lives. Another study found that the effect of Viagra in women significantly decreased due to a lower concentration of PDE5 inhibitors in the vagina and clitoris than in the penis. Studies have shown that Viagra pills can improve arousal problems in women, but they cannot treat problems with desire. Side effects of Viagra treatment were considered mild to moderate and included headaches, hot flashes, runny nose, and nausea.

Clinical trials and research on the side effects of Viagra were, of course, almost exclusively conducted on men. So, for women who experience arousal problems, are there any other medications that can help when Viagra can't do it? The answer to this, Morton says, will depend on the nature of the problem. For women, the brain is a much more important sexual organ and most of a woman's sexual response will begin in her brain. Approximately 42% of women taking Viagra reported increased satisfaction during preliminaries and sexual intercourse, compared to 28% of women taking placebo.