Is female and male Viagra the same thing?

Viagra is approved by the FDA for sexual dysfunction in men, but some women use it off-label for the same reason. There are some over-the-counter supplements that aim to treat the problem, which have limited, mostly unproven effects. However, in recent years, the FDA has approved two prescription drugs to treat HSDD. These treatments are often referred to as “female Viagra,” a nod to one of the medications men can take for sexual problems.

But they don't look much like Viagra. In fact, they work quite differently within the body. There is anecdotal evidence that Viagra can increase sexual pleasure in women. We know that Viagra works in men by increasing blood flow to the penis.

In women, it is believed that Viagra might increase blood flow to the female genital area, increasing lubrication and aiding orgasm. This theory has led to research on women taking Viagra. Many of these studies have focused on the treatment of FSD. However, medical trials to date have not produced significant evidence that Viagra works for women.

Although flibanserin is still very new to the market, clinical psychologists are already thinking that its success rate might not be as good. While Viagra's success rate is 48 to 81 percent, depending on the severity of erectile dysfunction, due to the complexity of female sexuality, taking a pill isn't exactly a cure for everything. Viagra is approved to treat erectile dysfunction in men. As stated by the manufacturer, Viagra is not approved by the FDA for women, including pregnant women.

Viagra can be particularly dangerous when combined with poppers (amyl nitrate), another drug that is often used recreationally to improve sexual sensation. The FDA describes two placebo-controlled trials that have demonstrated statistically significant increases in sexual desire and arousal among women who used Vyleesi. Studies suggest that women who take Viagra before having sex may experience fewer unwanted sexual side effects from the antidepressant. However, there is not enough evidence to say with certainty that the use of sildenafil to treat other women's health conditions is safe or effective.

A very common product that is talked about when mentioning female viagra is Flibanserin (trade name, Addyi). Since March of this year, the erectile dysfunction drug Viagra, formerly a prescription-only drug, is available for purchase without a prescription. Viagra (sildenafil), the infamous “blue pill”, is an FDA-approved drug for people with erectile dysfunction that helps improve blood flow to the penis. All that said, there have been some studies in which Viagra users have reported an increase in sexual pleasure.

It is called “female Viagra” as well as the “pink pill” and may slightly improve interest in sex. So why is Viagra not available to women and what about those who take it anyway (against general medical advice)? According to Dr. Karen Morton, consulting gynecologist and founder of Dr. Morton's medical helpline, the drug should not be considered a simple libido enhancer.

If you're looking for products used to treat sexual problems in women, you've probably heard of female Viagra.