Does viagra work for women?

When used in women, Viagra is thought to increase blood flow to the genitals so that there is more sensitivity and stimulation. Studies have shown that Viagra may provide a benefit for women who have difficulties with sexual arousal, as it may help them respond better to sexual stimulation. Viagra is FDA Approved to Treat Erectile Dysfunction in Men. It is not approved for use in women and studies so far have had mixed results.

There is no “female Viagra”, but there are a couple of drugs approved to treat sexual dysfunction in certain women. Sildenafil (Viagra) Treats Erectile Dysfunction in Men. In the United States, two drugs have been approved to treat low libido in women. Some people call these drugs “Viagra for women”.

Viagra seemed to work better in women with sexual arousal problems who previously had satisfying sex lives. It was less effective in those who had both arousal and sexual desire problems. There are some over-the-counter supplements that aim to treat the problem, which have limited, mostly unproven effects. However, in recent years, the FDA has approved two prescription drugs to treat HSDD.

These treatments are often referred to as “female Viagra”, a nod to one of the medications men can take for sexual problems. But they don't look much like Viagra. In fact, they work quite differently within the body. There is anecdotal evidence that Viagra may increase sexual pleasure in women.

We know that Viagra works in men by increasing blood flow to the penis. In women, it is believed that Viagra could increase blood flow to the female genital area, increasing lubrication and aiding orgasm. This theory has led to research on women taking Viagra. Many of these studies have focused on the treatment of FSD.

However, medical trials to date have not produced significant evidence that Viagra works for women. It also made its way into an episode of Sex and the City, in which sexually uninhibited character Samantha uses Viagra to shed her inhibitions even more. Viagra (also known as the “little blue pill”) is the trademark for sildenafil (see important safety information). VIAGRA can affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines can affect the way VIAGRA works, causing side effects.

Because it is a pink tablet and Viagra is a blue tablet, the nickname “female Viagra” was bound to happen. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) did not approve the use of female Viagra, although studies are still underway to use the drug in women for conditions ranging from dysmenorrhea to decreased libido. It has been called 'female Viagra', but this is very misleading, since it actually acts on the brain (whereas Viagra acts directly on blood flow to the penis). Viagra can be particularly dangerous if combined with poppers (amyl nitrate), another drug that is often used recreationally to improve sexual sensation.

The drug, which has been renamed Viagra Connect (sildenafil), works by increasing blood flow to the genitals, resulting in an erection in men. Viagra and other similar medications treat erectile dysfunction, when a man cannot have or maintain an erection firm enough to have sex. Studies have shown that Viagra pills can improve arousal problems in women, but they cannot treat problems with desire. Approximately 42% of women taking Viagra reported increased satisfaction during preliminaries and sexual intercourse, compared to 28% of women taking placebo.

Read on to learn more about why a health care provider may prescribe Viagra to a woman and what other options are available on the market. .